This section contains several sample race tracks, including tracks appropriate for beginning players. In addition to sample tracks, this section also provides guidelines and suggestions for race track creation; after you've played the game a few times, you will develop a sense of where to place flags and how to put together your own race tracks.

Guide to the Courses:
Each course has a suggested number of players, an estimated course complexity, and an approximate playing time. The time and complexity are largely based on the number of players, so fewer players will usually make for an easier (and shorter) game, while adding players increases complexity and play time. Complexity is a rough measure of how difficult the programs will be to create and how often robots will interact. High player interaction means programs must take into account not just the board, but other robots as well. Time is the typical time that moderately experienced players will take to play the game. (Beginners should expect to take longer.) If a track is rated as short, play time is about an hour; a moderate track takes about one to two hours, and a track rated as long will take more than two hours to complete.

Be Creative:
Perhaps the most important thing about race course construction is to be creative. Some fairly standard configurations are 1x2, 2x2 and 1x3. "L" shaped configurations and crisscrossing flag placements are more challenging and fun. (A sample "L" shaped configuration is included below.)

12 Square Rule:
Given a standard board configuration (4x4), a rule of thumb that results in fairly speedy games for two to three players is to have the flags completely within an area twelve squares by twelve squares (the size of a board). Using this rule, a robot can get somewhat off course and still not be too far away from the next flag. This also allows for more robot interaction, which may slow things down a bit for four or more players.

Path and Placement:
Both the location of flags and the path across the boards between them are important. Merely placing a flag behind a wall illustrates this point; depending on where you expect the robot to be coming from, the wall will be either behind the flag or in front of the flag. The courses included in this section further illustrate this point-two courses are different only in flag placement, but each has a different difficulty.

Sample Tracks:

Example 1

Players: 1-3
Complexity: easy
Time: short

Example 2

Players: 1-3
Complexity: moderate
Time: short

Example 3

Players: 1-3
Complexity: easy
Time: short

Example 4

Players: 1-3
Complexity: moderate
Time: moderate

Example 5

Players: 1-3
Complexity: moderate
Time: short

Example 6

Players: 1-3
Complexity: moderate
Time: moderate

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